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CALLIGRAPHY & FOUR TREASURES WORKSHOPS / EVENTS
CALLIGRAPHY STYLES WORKSHOPS / EVENTS
HISTORY OF CHINESE PAINTING WORKSHOPS / EVENTS
CHINESE PAINTING STYLES WORKSHOPS / EVENTS

 

teamaker’s
library
of fine arts
& tea

 

Tea Art Customs - The History

Although both the art of tea-making and tea-drinking used to be very serious affairs (purely for the enjoyment of the taste of tea alone as well as for the preservation of health), tea has endured the commercialisation that comes with expansion, especially over the past 100 years, leading it to being enjoyed mostly in combination with other, often recreational, activities such as for those who frequent public baths along with tea-drinking like at the Fukien tea houses. In the Canton region, it is often served with dim sum whereas other tea houses have become avenues for storytelling. 

There is a resurgence of the old, more genuine interest to tea-drinking with the more affluent upper classes commissioning exploration to find the most exceptional or luxury teas that can be savoured purely for the sake of enjoying its taste, as in times past during the Golden Age of tea especially surrounding the Sung dynasty (AD960-1279).

For further reference: 

Lam, Kam Chuen., et al. The Way of Tea: The Sublime Art of Oriental Tea Drinking. Gaia, 2002.

 

CALLIGRAPHY & FOUR TREASURES WORKSHOPS / EVENTS
CALLIGRAPHY STYLES WORKSHOPS / EVENTS
HISTORY OF CHINESE PAINTING WORKSHOPS / EVENTS
CHINESE PAINTING STYLES WORKSHOPS / EVENTS
DRY SCROLL MOUNTING WORKSHOPS / EVENTS

 

teamaker’s
library
of fine arts
& tea

 

“Ch’a”: The Discovery of Tea


There is no definitive agreement on when or how tea was first discovered but there is an interesting version about the mythical Chinese emperor Shen Nung who ruled for 17 generations before 2700BC where some random leaves fell into his pot of water by accident, which tasted bitter-sweet and made him feel refreshed and more alert, with a warmth passing through his body like a device testing every part. Hence, tea was initially named “ch’a” (the Chinese character for “to test or investigate”). 

The character later evolved to another version of “ch’a”, which depicts wood at the bottom with flowers and grass above it, and a man between the two characters; deeply symbolic of the balance between humankind and nature can be brought together holistically. 

For further reference: 

Lam, Kam Chuen., et al. The Way of Tea: The Sublime Art of Oriental Tea Drinking. Gaia, 2002.

 

CALLIGRAPHY & FOUR TREASURES WORKSHOPS / EVENTS
CALLIGRAPHY STYLES WORKSHOPS / EVENTS
HISTORY OF CHINESE PAINTING WORKSHOPS / EVENTS
CHINESE PAINTING STYLES WORKSHOPS / EVENTS
DRY SCROLL MOUNTING WORKSHOPS / EVENTS

 

teamaker’s
library
of fine arts
& tea

 

LONGQUAN CELADON - The History

Longquan celadon (龍泉青瓷) is a type of green-glazed Chinese ceramic, known in the West as celadon or greenware, produced from about 950 to 1550. The kilns were mostly located in Lishui prefecture in southwestern Zhejiang Province in the south of China, and the north of Fujian Province. Overall a total of some 500 kilns have been discovered,[2] making the Longquan celadon production area one of the largest historical ceramic producing areas in China. "Longquan-type" is increasingly preferred as a term, in recognition of this diversity, or simply "southern celadon",[3] as there was also a large number of kilns in north China producing Yaozhou wareor other Northern Celadon wares. These are similar in many respects, but with significant differences to Longquan-type celadon, and their production rose and declined somewhat earlier.[4]

 

CALLIGRAPHY & FOUR TREASURES WORKSHOPS / EVENTS
CALLIGRAPHY STYLES WORKSHOPS / EVENTS
HISTORY OF CHINESE PAINTING WORKSHOPS / EVENTS
CHINESE PAINTING STYLES WORKSHOPS / EVENTS
DRY SCROLL MOUNTING WORKSHOPS / EVENTS

 

teamaker’s
library
of fine arts
& tea

 

Chinese Tea Varieties

Fancy a bit of pepper in your Chinese tea? While the English always have their tea with milk, and jam remains a popular sweetening option for the Russian tea tradition, the northern Xinjiang province has been more accustomed to drink their tea with a little milk and salt, similar to the way it is enjoyed in Mongolia. 

Whether you prefer your tea best on its own like those from southern Xinjiang or in another manner, it remains a fact that over the many generations, the demandingly deep nature of the art of tea brewing has become so diversed from within the Chinese society to the rest of the world that the current available varieties are a true reflection of the different historical and cultural distinctiveness of each locality which has penetrated every known aspect of the tea-drinking community, leaving it uniquely appreciated from region to region. 

An example of an exquisite and health-beneficial method of relishing tea would be to add pepper and kuei pi (or cassia bark) to the tea before boiling the brew for four minutes prior to pouring and drinking. It has been known that the pepper functions to improve one’s appetite, while the kuei pi is said to aid those who suffer from shortness of breath. If you could use the benefits of both these ingredients in your diet to enhance your well-being, you can try this southern China fashion of tea-making. It is advised to best consume this tea concoction at least thrice a day with meals to enjoy maximum benefits. 

For further reference: 

Lam, Kam Chuen., et al. The Way of Tea: The Sublime Art of Oriental Tea Drinking. Gaia, 2002.

 

CALLIGRAPHY & FOUR TREASURES WORKSHOPS / EVENTS
CALLIGRAPHY STYLES WORKSHOPS / EVENTS
HISTORY OF CHINESE PAINTING WORKSHOPS / EVENTS
CHINESE PAINTING STYLES WORKSHOPS / EVENTS
DRY SCROLL MOUNTING WORKSHOPS / EVENTS